I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness for it shows me the stars. — Og Mandino

po_Degas-Edgar1Edgar Degas (born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar De Gas; (July 19, 1834 – September 27, 1917) was a French artist famous for his paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings.

Degas is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers. He is regarded as one of the founders of Impressionism, although he rejected the term, and preferred to be called a realist. He was a superb draftsman, and particularly masterly in depicting movement, as can be seen in his renditions of dancers, racecourse subjects and female nudes. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.

At the beginning of his career, he wanted to be a history painter, a calling for which he was well prepared by his rigorous academic training and close study of classic art. In his early thirties, he changed course, and by bringing the traditional methods of a history painter to bear on contemporary subject matter, he became a classical painter of modern life.po_Degas-Edgar9 po_Degas-Edgar2bpo_Degas-Edgar4