I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness for it shows me the stars. — Og Mandino

Jane Kenyon (May 23, 1947 – April 22, 1995) was an American poet.

Her work is often characterized as simple, spare, and emotionally resonant. New Hampshire’s poet laureate at the time of her untimely death at age forty-seven, Jane Kenyon was noted for verse that probed the inner psyche, particularly with regard to her own battle against depression that lasted throughout much of her adult life.

 

IN THE NURSING HOME
Jane Kenyon

She is like a horse grazing
a hill pasture that someone makes
smaller by coming every night
to pull the fences in and in.

She has stopped running wide loops,
stopped even the tight circles.
She drops her head to feed; grass
is dust, and the creekbed’s dry.

Master, come with your light
halter. Come and bring her in.

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LET EVENING COME
Jane Kenyon

Let the light of late afternoon
shine chinks in the barn, moving
up bales as the sun moves down.

Let the cricket take up chafing
as a woman takes up her needles
and her yarn. Let evening come.

Let dew collect on the hoe abandoned
in long grass. Let the stars appear
and the moon disclose her silver horn.

Let the fox go back to its sandy den.
Let the wind dies down. Let the shed
go black inside. Let evening come.

To the bottle in the ditch, to the scoop
in the oats, to air in the lung
let evening come.

Let it come, as it will, and don’t
be afraid. God does not leave us
comfortless, so let evening come.