Rolling Stone Magazine

po_magazine-rolling-stone2Rolling Stone is a biweekly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco, published on November 9, 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine’s publisher, and music critic Ralph J. Gleason.

The magazine was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson. In the 1990s, the magazine shifted focus to a younger readership interested in youth-oriented television shows, film actors, and popular music. In recent years, the magazine has resumed its traditional mix of content.

“At [Ralph] Gleason’s suggestion, Wenner named his magazine after a Bob Dylan song.” Then Wenner stated in the first issue that the title of the magazine referred to the 1950 blues song, “Rollin’ Stone”, recorded by Muddy Waters, the rock and roll band The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan’s hit single “Like a Rolling Stone”. Rolling Stone initially identified with and reported the hippie counterculture of the era. However, the magazine distanced itself from the underground newspapers of the time, such as Berkeley Barb, embracing more traditional journalistic standards and avoiding the radical politics of the underground press. In the very first edition of the magazine, Wenner wrote that Rolling Stone “is not just about the music, but about the things and attitudes that music embraces.”

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