Lyndon B. Johnson

po_Johnson-LyndonLyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969), a position which he assumed after his service as the 37th Vice President (1961–1963).

Johnson was a Democrat from Texas who served as a United States Representative from 1937 to 1949 and as a United States Senator from 1949 to 1961, including six years as Senate Majority Leader, two as Senate Minority Leader, and two as Senate Majority Whip.

Historians argue that Johnson’s presidency marked the peak of modern liberalism in the United States after the New Deal era. Johnson is ranked favorably by some historians because of his domestic policies and the passage of several laws in his tenure, including civil rights, gun control, and social security.