I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness for it shows me the stars. — Og Mandino

po_Brahms-Johannes2Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer and pianist.

Lullabies written by established classical composers are often given the form-name berceuse, which is French for lullaby, or cradle song. The most famous lullaby is the one by Johannes Brahms (“Wiegenlied”, 1868).

 

 

Brahms’ original in German:

Guten Abend, gute Nacht, mit Rosen bedacht,
Mit Näglein besteckt, schlüpf unter die Deck!’
Morgen früh, wenn Gott will, wirst du wieder geweckt
Morgen früh, wenn Gott will, wirst du wieder geweckt

Guten Abend, gute Nacht, von Englein bewacht
Die zeigen im Traum, dir Christkindleins Baum
Schlaf nun selig und süß, schau im Traum ‘s Paradies
Schlaf nun selig und süß, schau im Traum ‘s Paradies
A close English translation of which is:

Good evening, and good night, with roses adorned,
With carnations covered, slip under the covers.
Early tomorrow, if God wills, you will wake once again.
Early tomorrow, if God wills, you will wake once again.

Good evening, and good night. By angels watched,
Who show you in your dream the Christ-child’s tree.
Sleep now peacefully and sweetly, see the paradise in your dream.
Sleep now peacefully and sweetly, see the paradise in your dream.

The most common English version is as follows:

Lullaby and good night, with roses bedight
With lilies o’er spread is baby’s wee bed
Lay thee down now and rest, may thy slumber be blessed
Lay thee down now and rest, may thy slumber be blessed

Lullaby and good night, thy mother’s delight
Bright angels beside my darling abide
They will guard thee at rest, thou shalt wake on my breast
They will guard thee at rest, thou shalt wake on my breast.